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Web Design at University of Juba

University of Juba
College of Community Studies and Rural Development
Department of Development Communication
BSc/BSc (Hons) in Development Communication
Fourth Year, Semester VIII Course 2017 – 2018

Course Title:                        Web Page Design
Course Code:                        CRC 484
Credit Hours: 3         Semester: 8 [10 July-04 August 2017]

Visiting Lecturer:
Dr. William Tayeebwa (Ph.D.)
Senior Lecturer and Head,
Department of Journalism and Communication,
Makerere University, Uganda
Email: wtayebwa@gmail.com
Cell: +256.752.482 892

Aim:
The aim of this course is to provide the students with the basic knowledge and skills in designing simple web pages. The major goal will be to ensure that the students understand the most widely used website design platforms for newsgathering/dissemination by journalists as well as the sourcing/distribution of messages by development communication specialists.

Course Objectives:

  • By the end of the Semester, students should be able to:
    Have a good grasp of the key concepts used in Web Design;
  • Understand and appreciate the most commonly used platforms in newsgathering/dissemination as well as in the sourcing/ distribution of development communication messages;
  • Design simple web pages using different graphics programmes, particularly the readily available ones such WordPress and Microsoft Publisher.

Modes of Instruction and Assessment:

The first part of the course will be dedicated to the conceptualization of the various terms and principles used in Web Design. The course materials for this part will be mainly textbooks and online resources. The method of instruction for this part will be mainly through lectures and class demonstrations.

The second part of the course will emphasize practical aspects of Web Design. Resources permitting, this part will be in a laboratory with computers connected to the Internet. The method of instruction will be overseeing the development of websites (or blogs), preferably in small groups.

For class assessment purposes, there shall be a comprehension test after Part One of the course, as well as a practical project at the end of Part Two. The coursework will constitute 30% of the total grade, while the final examination will constitute 70% as per the University of Juba academic guidelines. However, please note that Section C of the Examination will be done in advance under the supervision of the Lecturer.

Whereas I will not award marks for class attendance, please recall that University of Juba regulations oblige you to attend at least 75% of the course contact hours. Besides, you will most likely not pass well your tests, assignments and examination if you don’t class regularly.

Course Outline/Description:
Module One (Week 01): How the Web works [the Internet versus the Web; Browsers; Web Page addresses (URLs); the anatomy of a web page]
Module Two (Week 02): Understanding Web Page design software [General]
Module Three (Week 03): Understanding Web Page design software [MS Publisher]
Module Four (Week 04): Understanding Web Page design software [WordPress]
Module Five (Week 05): Creating Web Pages – HTML Overview
Module Six (Week 06): Creating Web Pages – HTML Overview
Module Seven (Week 07): Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Orientation
Comprehension Test
Week Eight: Creating websites or blogs using WordPress
PRACTICAL EXERCISES IN THE LAB
Week Nine: Creating websites or blogs using WordPress
PRACTICAL EXERCISES IN THE LAB
Week Ten: Creating websites or blogs using WordPress
PRACTICAL EXERCISES IN THE LAB
Week Eleven: Creating websites or blogs using WordPress
PRACTICAL EXERCISES IN THE LAB
Week Twelve: Creating websites or blogs using WordPress
PRACTICAL EXERCISES IN THE LAB
Week Thirteen: Creating websites or blogs using WordPress
PRACTICAL EXERCISES IN THE LAB
Week Fourteen: Wrapping up the course with issues arising
Submission of Final Class Project in lieu of Practical Examination Section C

References:
Frydenberg Shelly (2011). WEB 2.0: Concepts and Applications. Boston: Course Technology, Cengage Learning
Harrel William (2011). HTML, CSS and JavaScript: Mobile Development for Dummies.         Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
History of the World Wide Web. Available online at https://www.w3.org/History.html
Intranets and Extranets. Available online at http://www.bbc.co.uk/webwise/guides/intranets-and-extranets
Introduction to Blogging in WordPress. Available online at www.wordpress.com
Robbins, Jennifer Niederst (2012). Learning Web Design: A Beginner’s Guide to HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Web Graphics. 4th Edition. Cambridge: O’Reilly
Rule Jeff (1999). Dynamic HTML: The HTML Developer’s Guide. Ontario: Addison-Wesley

Good Luck in Your Career

Academic Stuff, Journal Articles

East African Communication Association (EACA) Conference Paper – August 29-31, Uganda Christian University, Mukono

From conventional towards new frames of peace journalism

By Dr. William Tayeebwa,

Department of Journalism and Communication, Makerere University

Abstract

This paper uses propositions by peace journalism scholars to evaluate the uptake of conventional journalism frames that often valorize conflict or violence against those that promote peace.

The empirical data from a survey interrogation of Ugandan journalists (n=183) shows that while appreciative of the frames of peace coverage, practitioners still apprize the conventional frames that promote violence such as ‘drama’; ‘crisis’; ‘extremism’; ‘threats’; and ‘destruction’ among others.

Using fieldwork evidence, this paper makes a praxis contribution by proposing a deconstruction in journalism of the entrenched frames of conflict or violence by focusing on frames of peace coverage such as ‘patience and moderation’; ‘cooperation and consensus’; ‘calm belligerents’; ‘peacemakers and peace processes’; ‘humanisation of enemies’ among others.

The paper argues that such frames of peace reporting ought to progressively replace the conventional frames of conflict or violence within journalism pedagogy and praxis.

Key words: peace journalism; news values; normative theory; media frames; peace; conflict; violence; Uganda